Video Pictures - Bokashi Fermenting and Burial of Food Waste and Pet Waste


Sustainable Cycling of Food and Pet Waste


Bokashi fermenting perhaps more accurately described as acidic anaerobic fermentation is a simple and effective method of rapidly metabolizing organic waste. This can be done at almost any scale and results in virtually all of the nutrients including carbon going back to soil within a matter of days. No heat, gases or methane are produced in this process which takes place within sealed fermenters.

We will show you how to rapidly, efficiently, and safely recycle organic waste. There is an abundance of organic waste and it can be far more efficiently handled at home or on the farm. Homeowners can enrich their soil and will note the savings in garbage bills because waste is not being put at the curb or in a can to be hauled away where no good will come of it.

Farmers can re-establish their markets locally with better crops and produce when they process culled waste from local food processors and return fermented wasted organic material efficiently back to soil.

Transport costs are lower and a dependence on chemical fertilizers can be realized. Nutrients derived from Bokashi (acidic anaerobic) fermenting are not so readily leached out of the soil and many farmers have noted fields where Bokashi fermenting is in practice appear under lower pest pressure compared to those fields where abundant chemical fertizliers and pesticides have been used in practice.

The videos address as examples each of the three general waste streams typically encountered - Residential food scraps and waste, Pet Waste (Dog and Cat), and Industrial Commercial (restaurant, schools, etc) waste.

Residential Food Scraps and Waste


Bokashi Food Waste Recycling - with microbes Part 1

Bokashi Fermented Food Scraps & Tea - microbes Part 2

How to bury Bokashi Fermented Waste Products

Dog & Cat Pet Waste (including Litter) Disposal


Pet Waste Disposal ----------------- Using Microbes Part 1

Pet Waste Disposal ----------------- Using Microbes Part 2

Pet Waste Disposal ----------------- Using Microbes Part 3

Pet Waste Disposal ----------------- Using Microbes Part 4

Sustainable Farm Industrial Processing of Waste


Bokashicycle and New Earth Farm (Hillsboro, OR) have established an efficient cycling of waste moving from the restaurants back to the farm in the form of food scraps that are fermented and put back to soil to support subsequent produce used in the restaurant by chefs who prepare meals for their customers.

Food waste material is collected and inoculated with bokashi culture mix. It is then shredded and placed in 55 gallon fermenters to ferment 7 - 10 days. The fermented product is then allowed to drain and subsequently spread on the farm land to be tilled. Fermented food waste tilled in the soil is virtually indistinguishable from other soils within 7 - 10 days after tilling except for the fact it is enriched. After 14 days in the soil crops are planted again in the enriched soil completing the full cycle ---[farm produce to consumer]---[waste back to farm]---[new produce back to consumer].

This cycle is far less costly than traditional composting and is 10 times faster than composting. The process does not generate heat or gases. Methane producing microbes do not tolerate the conditions of acidic anaerobic fermenting. Greenhouse gases are eliminated in the process in stark contrast to composting operations. Water , a precious resource is conserved and never added to support the processing of waste. Traditional composting consumes water.

In summary, Bokashi fermenting on a commercial scale is far less costly than composting and it is more efficient. Foul odors are virtually eliminated. And the process results in soil enriched in nutrients and microbes.

Bokashi tea recovery from 55 gallon fermenters---------

Positioning 55 gallon fermenters for tea collection------

Adding Bokashi culture mix to food waste collection pre-shredding

Adding Bokashi culture mix to food waste collection pre-shredding

Shredding equipment for Bokashi fermenting

Tractor drive hook up with shredder

Loading and moving 55 gallon fermenters

Use of off-loading device to drain fermenters

Emptying fermented end product part 1

Emptying fermented end product part 2

Emptying fermented end product part 3

Positioning shredder for efficient processing of food waste

Adjustments and position of shredder for processing

Shredding inoculated food waste

Soil results after 7 days post mixing with fermented food waste

Spreading fermented food waste in the field

End of Farm Videos

Assembly and Use - 1 Ton Bokashi Fermenter Off-loading Machine


A machine capable of handling 1 ton of bokashi fermented product is available to assist operators in collecting product from their 55 gallon fermenters. It is assembled easily for use in harvesting Bokashi Tea.

This machine allows farmers and managers to process 4 55 gallon barrels of waste material at a time. One operator can assemble and disassemble the machine and easily harvest tea and bokashi end product for field applications.

Bokashi fermenting with 55 gallon fermenters is fast and efficient returning virtually 100 % of the food waste nutrients to enrich soil and expand microbe diversity and numbers. Each 55 gallon filled fermenter will weigh about 450 pounds. The off-loading machine makes the job of processing end product efficient with safety.

Bokashi Compost Harvest Machine - Assembly Part 1 of 5

Bokashi Compost Harvest Machine - Assembly Part 2 of 5

Bokashi Compost Harvest Machine - Assembly Part 3 of 5

Bokashi Compost Harvest Machine - Assembly Part 4 of 5

Bokashi Compost Harvest Machine - Assembly Part 5 of 5

Bokashi Culture Mix...Observations and uses


Bokashicycle PetCycle Pet Waste Fermenting System Part 1 of 2 by Dr. Green

Bokashicycle PetCycle Pet Waste Fermenting System Part 2 of 2 by Dr. Green

Bokashi Cycle in the kitchen Part I

Bokashi Cycle in the kitchen Part II

Burying Bokashi fermented food scraps in the backyard

Using Bokashi saves money by reducing your trash hauling costs

Planting Bokashi in the ground

Planting Bokashi in the ground Part II

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Vancouver, BC Solid Waste Management

Using Bokashi saves money by reducing your trash hauling costs

White spots on my Bokashi culture mix Part I

White spots on my Bokashi culture mix Part II

White spots on my Bokashi culture mix Part III